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Book Discussion: Panic

Panic

Panic by Lauren Oliver

Summary

No one knows who invented Panic. But every summer in Carp, New York, Panic is played. The rules are simple: Graduating seniors (and only seniors) can participate in Panic. The games end at the end of the summer, and the winner takes all.

Dodge plans to play and win Panic. He’s seeking revenge, and he knows exactly how he will get it. But what happens when he forms bonds with some of the other competitors?

Hannah did not plan on playing for the pot. Even though she desperately needs the money (and the opportunity to get out of her small town), she has seen Panic maim and kill too many people. She’s not that stupid… until she is.

Panic follows the teenage competitors of a dangerous, stupid, and life-changing game as they see if they have what it takes to beat their own panic.

 

 

 

Panic

heartRomance Score: You’re Trying  

Panic involves romances between several competitors and spectators in an ultra-dangerous sport. As you can imagine, mind games and manipulation are a major part of winning these games. It’s hard to get behind romances built and sustained on lies. Even when the characters showed their reasons for their choices, there wasn’t enough build up to really get behind the romances. I found myself disliking all the characters, and therefore not really able to get behind any of the romances.

Feminist Score:  Between  You’re Trying and Good EffortRosie

I hate the reason that Hannah started playing the games (why do so many plot points start with impressing a boy?), but started to like her throughout the competition. Hannah is a strong character – brave, loyal, and willing to do anything to protect her little sister.  Her loyalty to her friends is admirable, even when they don’t deserve it. And I like how she has the mental presence and physical power to compete with the male competitors in Panic.

diversity people circle iconDiversity Score:  Good Effort 

This book doesn’t dive deeply into the cultural experiences of any characters (they’re too busy playing stupid, deadly games), but I was surprised and impressed by the diverse cast. Main characters Natalie and Dodge (seem) to be non-white, and other minor characters have non-white sounding names. More importantly, I appreciated the setting of the story. Unlike many YA books, set in wealthy suburbs or big cities, Panic is set in a small, poor, decaying town in rural New York. Teenagers have few opportunities, and the money offered winning Panic is enough to give them a chance at life outside Carp. I appreciated a story in a non-wealthy setting.

wow iconAwesome Factor: Between You’re Trying and Good Effort  

I wanted to like this book, but it just fell short. First, it was hard for me to get behind the idea of such a deadly and dangerous competition. Most of the competitors were unlikable from the beginning, and this just seemed like such a stupid, teenager-y thing to do. And because I never connected with the characters, it was hard for me to root for anyone throughout the competition. It was as if Katniss was unlikeable from the beginning of Hunger Games… who would you root for then?

While the premise of Panic was interesting enough, I just couldn’t get behind the stupidity of the games. And the ending didn’t give me any indication that the stupidity had been solved (or at least, realized by the characters), so I was left unsatisfied.

Favorite Character

Honestly, I couldn’t stand most of the characters. Hannah’s little sister, Lily, is the closest thing that could come to a favorite character, but only because she was sweet and helpless.

 

Is this worth a book hangover?

Not quite. While I enjoyed Lauren Oliver’s Delirium series, I don’t think Panic is hangover-worthy. 

 Fun Author(s) Fact 

Lauren Oliver is a co-founder of Paper Lantern Lit, a literary incubator. According to their website’s aptly named “WTF” section,

“[PPL] comes up with story ideas, we plot them using our knowledge and experience with narrative structure, and we coach authors through the writing process. Like architects, we envision, design and layout all the basics of a book, but it’s our writers who inhabit them and bring them to life. When a project is ready, we sell it to one of the publishing giants.”

 

Read This Next

If you’re looking for well-written, diverse dystopian future books, check out Love is The Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson (our review here). A deadly flu hits the United States, shutting down the elite prep school world that Bird inhabits. But what if the flu is not what everyone thinks it is?

Post Author: Anisha

Anisha

Anisha loves books, Gilmore Girls, and her Kuerig. She’s been reading mainstream YA since she was actually a young adult, and Jess is helping her expand her horizons with more diverse, interesting books from newer authors.

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Filed under Contemporary, High School, Romance

Book Chat: Summer of Chasing Mermaids

the-summer-of-chasing-mermaids-9781481401272_hr

 

Summer of Chasing Mermaids by Sarah Ockler

Summary

Elyse d’Abreau knew what her life was supposed to look like. She was a talented singer living in Trinidad and Tobago with her tight-knit family. She and her twin, Natalie, were on the brink of stardom. They were only days away from going on a world-wide singing tour. Her dreams were about to come true.

But a tragic accident forces Elyse to reconsider her goals. Elyse can’t sing anymore and needs space from her former life. She moves to Oregon to live with her aunt and cousin, and learns to rebuild her life in a new place. When a cute boy comes for the summer, though, she’s intrigued. Their romance blooms over a love of boats, their families, and an unhealthy competition that threatens to destroy the Oregon home she’s come to love.

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Favorite Character

Elyse. Elyse stands up her herself and her friends, and has a clear morale compass for right and wrong. I also love how she owns her sexuality in so many ways (listen to the podcast for more steamy details!).

Favorite Line

Elyse writes poetry, and there are many incredible lines. One of our favorites is excerpted below:

If everyone followed rules

As they were written, as they were said

You wouldn’t be allowed to vote…

Rules are rules, yet still

trumped always by kindness and human decency.

Let. Him. March.”

The full poem is even more beautiful.

Is this worth a book hangover?

YES. This book is beautifully written romance story with unique, diverse characters. We highly recommend it.

Fun Author Fact

According to her website , Sarah Ockler does tarot readers for her characters and plot. Tarot cards appear a few times in Summer of Chasing Mermaids – now we know why!

Read This Next

For another (slightly sadder) romance, check out My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga. Aysel and Roman are both regulars in online suicide forums, and make a pact to help each other die. But as their romance blooms, Aysel realizes that she’s not sure she’s ready to die. We reviewed this book last April on the blog!

Post Author: Anisha

Anisha

Anisha loves books, Gilmore Girls, and her Kuerig. She’s been reading mainstream YA since she was actually a young adult, and Jess is helping her expand her horizons with more diverse, interesting books from newer authors.

Leave a comment

Filed under Contemporary, Heavy Topics, podcast, Romance