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Scavenger of Souls

Scavenger of Souls by Joshua David Bellin (Survival Colony 9 #2, but stands alone)27206580

Summary

Querry has no memory of life before a few months ago, but he’s doing his best to put the pieces together and keep his family and friends safe as they journey across the desert. His mother isn’t ready to give answers and things get more complicated when they find another group of people thriving in the wasteland.

As the mysteries deepen, Querry must find answers before the world erupts in a second apocalyptic fire.

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Romance Score: Between You’re Trying and Good Effort

I didn’t really feel the sparks in the main relationship, maybe because there was too much history between the two families or too many mysteries. I also think it’s tough when there are very small communities of people left and people end up with one of the only other survivors their age because it’s almost like an inevitable thing and not about feelings.

Feminist Score: Good Effort

The ladies in this book are interesting characters in their own rights. They make choices to keep themselves and the people they love alive. I appreciated that they were able to make mistakes, too. Through Aleka, we get an example of someone that does things for love and then must come to terms with the consequences – I like that she is allowed to without being villainized for her decisions.

Mercy is also a young woman that stands up for herself and struggles to find her place. She has been given a difficult situation and does the best she can to deal with it. She is strong, but allowed to be vulnerable.

There’s also a character that takes advantage of women. One of these women continues to fight against his (inhuman) power and the abuse on the page is light, so this wasn’t a deal breaker for me.

Diversity Score: Good Effort

I LOVED that this was a post-apocalypse book with people of color. And not like in Fury Road – in this world, background and main players are people of color – just like the real world.

There’s also a couple of characters with gigantism, although that isn’t explored in a very full way. Off of my limited knowledge, I would say this plays to stereotypes more than to a holistic picture of the physical issues that come with it.

One of the characters also ends the story as an amputee and, while we don’t get a lot of time with her at this point, her reaction provides some insight into what life may be like after losing a limb.

Awesome Factor: Good Effort

The story is intriguing and you don’t need to have read the first to get into this book. I’m always interested in seeing how an author has decided humanity will destroy itself – the premise here is definitely an engaging twist on the science-gone-too-far idea, although I was a confused on the exact specifics at the end (perhaps due to my own poor reading).


Favorite Character

Nessa – she doesn’t get a ton of time on the page, but when she does, she’s fighting everyone’s (low) expectations of her and doing what she must to survive

Fun Author Fact

Bellin has a blog highlighting YA and the writing process and the books he features are all over the place, so it’s pretty cool.

Is this worth a book hangover?

Scavenger of Souls features determined characters with a lot of spunk that face a difficult world and situation. If you’re intrigued by how far we’re willing to push science for the “good of the world” and what consequences may come from it, this is a story for you. If you’re interested in books that are about characters making difficult decisions, this is also for you.

Read These Next

Origin by Jessica Khoury for another story about (un)ethical science or 3:59 by Gretchen McNeil for characters that must face themselves and determine what, if anything, of ground-breaking discoveries the world should have.

Post Author: Jess

I received a free copy of Scavenger of Souls through Netgalley and then failed miserably through procrastination and bought my own copy.

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Book Discussion: Otherbound

16081758Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis

Amara is never alone – but she doesn’t know it until Nolan finally manages to push his way into controlling her body.

Nolan has always lived in two worlds; his own, struggling to focus on his school work and his family, and Amara’s, seeing flashes of her life as he blinks through his own.

When they finally realize they’re truly connected, both of their worlds are transformed by political intrigue and the race to keep Princess Cilla alive.

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heartRomance Score: Good Effort

Three relationships develop throughout the story. Amara and her fellow servant/slave Maart is the most established. It’s obvious there is true affection and love, but I do sort of wonder if it’s a relationship and love borne out of the dire and lonely circumstances that the two found themselves in. Amara and…the person from the end is a little surprising and there are hints of it throughout the book, but it’s interesting to see how it plays out once the politics are out of the way because of the previous power dynamics. Nolan and his flirtation are very cute and show that Nolan is finally fighting for his own world alongside Amara’s.

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Feminist Score: Between Good Effort and A+ Success

Amara and Cilla are doing what they must to survive. If that isn’t the feminist story right there, what is. They fight for what they believe in and for each other. It’s interesting that Cilla doesn’t see her privilege and that Amara must maneuver through the power imbalance to make things work. I see a lot of echoes of the troubles in the feminist movement (white feminism vs inclusive feminism) here, although the skin colors don’t correlate (also, echoes of pretty much any system that privileges people in our world). I liked that all the women in this story are whole characters – even when you only get small bits of their lives (like the Captain’s) you still see them as more than just an empty vessel to move the plot.

I don’t give full points because I do feel like it’s tough when a male character is forcing his way into a woman character’s head and controlling her body – while I know that Nolan wasn’t necessarily doing it on purpose (all the time), it still feels like a kind of mental rape in some sense.

diversity people circle icon Diversity Score: A+ Success

There is a lot of ground covered in this book. Nolan is suffering from what looks like epilepsy in our world and Cilla has curse-created hemophilia. Nolan is missing a foot and uses a prosthetic; he is also probably depressed since he can’t fully function in any world, but he also can’t leave either behind. I do find it interesting when what is considered a disability in our world has a magical explanation – since we find that Nolan has never had epilepsy, that’s just the our-world diagnosis for a magical malady, I think it somewhat avoids the “magical cure.” BUT, it’s a difficult thing to maneuver.

Nolan is of Mexican-descent. His family speaks Spanish or Nahuatl at home and when they cook a “real” meal he has to call Grandma Pérez for instructions. Plus, his family is financially struggling, something you don’t often see in YA and underscoring the deep problems with healthcare and health-related expenses in our world.

Princess Cilla is dark skinned and there is a wide variety of skin colors in other characters in Amara’s world. As we move through the story, we learn that Amara is bisexual (#ownvoices story) and find what looks like a happy ending with someone. All in all, there is a lot here that gets pulled into the story while always feeling like it has a purpose to the characters and plot.

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Awesome Factor: Good Effort

I really liked the premise of the book and the story. I thought it was an interesting idea and I love parallel universe/magic worlds! I thought the characters and their stories were intriguing and I was pulled in. I loved seeing such a diverse group of characters going along without that being key to the story.

There was a lot of build up to the climax of the story – action happened at the very end and, while it was all really good, it felt like everything happened really quickly. I also feel that some of the things lacked explanation: what exactly pulled the travelers into Amara’s world? why was Nolan only able to “watch” for so long? what made him weak when the other travelers were strong and able to control their “hosts”? I want to know more about the mechanisms!


Favorite Character

Amara – She’s resourceful and dedicated to what she believes is right and wrong. I appreciated her desire to escape servitude coupled with her understanding of the difficult blurring of friendship and servant/master relationships.

Favorite Line

“Amara had chosen to love the Maart of yesterday and today. She couldn’t look beyond that…Amara knew he’d already chosen every version of her.”

The idea of this kind of love = swoon.

Is this worth a book hangover?

This is definitely a more character driven story. The world is built on small details with little things pulled in to add to it – like not saying someone’s name after they die – that help underscore the differences between Nolan and Amara’s worlds. The action comes close to the end and, while it’s not as big a climax as you might expect for the length, it’s still good.

Fun Author Fact

Duyvis is one of the co-runners of Disability in KidLit, a site we absolutely recommend. She is also autistic and bisexual and champions the #ownvoices cause in books.

Read These Next

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo for another full cast of folks that represent the real world,  Adaptation by Malinda Lo for a more sci-fi thriller in our world, or  The Abyss Surrounds Us by Emily Skrutskie for more fantasy with pirates, sea monsters, and lady-lady action.

Post Author: Jess

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Jess loves SFF – old and new school –  and is learning to appreciate the more lovey-dovey YA under the careful tutelage of Anisha’s recommendations.

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Book Discussion: Shadowshaper

22295304Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

Summary

Sierra is excited to spend the summer with her friends and to finish up the mural she started on an abandoned building on her block. That is…until the murals around her start to move and fade and the people around her start to keep secrets. As she digs into just what is going on, she learns that her family’s heritage involves shadowshaping – using specific talents to harness the powers of the spirits around them. But someone is attacking shadowshapers and instead of enjoying the summer she has to figure out how to stop the killer and save her family.

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Romance Score: A+ Success

The tingles between Robbie and Sierra are a slow burn that doesn’t take over the narrative. Sierra depends on Robbie for information about shadowshaping and respects him for his drawing skills long before she starts to feel anything extra for him. It’s only as the mystery – and danger – build that she starts to accept that he could be anything more. Her feelings for him are only a small part of the story unfolding and I liked that it was more about Sierra rocking her new skills and accepting her family’s heritage with a small side of heart business.

Rosie

Feminist Score: A+ Success

There are several different kinds of ladies in this book, but they all rock it. Sierra fights for what she wants, protecting her friends, family, and her desire to understand her family history. Sierra’s grandmother proves that there’s no way to stop a matriarch when she’s made a decision – even if she has to sacrifice herself. And, even though we may disagree with her decisions, we understand why Sierra’s mother made the decisions she did when faced with difficult choices (and we get to see her change her mind). Plus, there’s no single way to be a woman – we have Sierra that likes to dress in old tee shirts and jeans, Bennie that wants to be a scientist or or biologist or…something intellectualee, T and Izzy, Sierra’s two lesbian friends, and Nydia, a Puerto Rican working at the Colombia library. All of them are doing their best to be their best in a world set against them.

Sierra calls out a lot of things throughout the book. She talks about her natural hair and loving it even if it’s not considered “good hair.” She talks about colorism in the community and rants at her aunt for acting like lighter is better. She gets whistled at, yelled at, and propositioned while walking down the street and points out how messed up it is. If it’s something women (especially women of color) deal with, Sierra hits on it.

diversity people circle iconDiversity Score: A+ Success

This book blows it away. We have Sierra – Puerto Rican-American, Robbie – Haitian (American?), and Sierra’s friends from several backgrounds. Tee and Izzy are lesbians. Her grandfather has recently suffered a stroke and is incapacitated in many ways. The story takes play in Brooklyn, New York, and you get strong sense of place. Conversations about gentrification occur a couple of times without feeling like they were stuck in to “make a point.” And the book revolves around non-European folklore and ancestral memory which we also don’t see often.

The book will be a strong mirror for many readers – there’s Spanish (not italicized), food, dancing, music, and other cultural markers that will mean everything to readers that don’t usually get to see themselves in books. It will also serve as a good window book – though that is a side bonus, not the focus – because Older writes with such a deft hand and Sierra is an engaging character.

wow iconAwesome Factor: A+ Success

The characters and story are engaging. The location and sense of place are on point and the pace does not let go once it gets started. I really enjoyed the story and almost missed my metro stop a couple of times because I couldn’t stop reading. There’s a lot going on in the book peripheral to the story – police brutality, gentrification, misogyny, sexism, racism – they all get attention but it never feels like it’s been shoved in to make an issue. Instead, it always feels like a natural part of Sierra’s (and her friends’) experience.

I really liked Sierra’s voice and the fun cast of characters that she brings with her. I would definitely recommend this to anyone that enjoys paranormal, supernatural, urban, fantasy, or action-packed stories.

Also – THAT COVER.


Favorite Character

Sierra – because she’s spunky, and bright, and doesn’t let other people’s expectations or restrictions hold her back. (But, I want to give a shout out to Bennie for being an awesome friend that reps the nerdy side of things.)

Favorite Line

This is long, but I laughed out loud. Plus, since I studied anthropology in university, I feel a little extra love for this excerpt. I also loved the way this book discussed the ethical (and privilege) issues around anthropology.

“Imma write a book,” Tee announced. “It’s gonna be about white people.”

Izzy scowled. “Seriously, Tee: Shut up. Everyone can hear you.”

“I’m being serious,” Tee said. “If this Wick cat do all this research about Sierra’s grandpa and all his Puerto Rican spirits, I don’t see why I can’t write a book about his people. Imma call it Hipster vs. Yuppie: a Culturalpological Study.

Is this worth a book hangover?

Absolutely. It was fast, fun, and exciting. I enjoyed getting to know Sierra and her family  – and her family’s heritage. I definitely recommend this is you’re looking for something action filled.

Fun Author Fact

Older has one of the most interesting twitter accounts – if you care about young adult books, diversity, representation, inequality, and justice in the US.

Read These Next

This Side of Home by Renée Watson for a story about twins dealing with a neighborhood in change or Black Beauty by Constance Burris for another paranormal story deeply rooted in place and community.

 

 

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Filed under Adventure, Contemporary, Science Fiction & Fantasy

Book Chat: Push Girl

Push Girl by Chelsie Hill & Jessica Love

SummaryPush Girl

As Kara leaves a party one night, she has no idea that her drive home will change her life forever. Kara is hit by a drunk driver, and wakes up in the hospital and can’t feel her legs. The doctor breaks the news to her – she’ll never be able to walk again.

Suddenly, life as she knew it is over. Not only does she have to adapt to life in a wheelchair, but her relationships drastically change. Her cute, popular boyfriend won’t visit or call her, her dad is acting over-protective, and her mom won’t look her in the eye. Worst of all, she can no longer participate in dance, the great love of her life.

Push Girl is the story about the after – after the accident, after your life is changed forever, and after you learn who your true friends are. Kara learns about how to make a life for yourself after life as you know it is over.

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Favorite Character

Amanda . She’s exactly the friend that Kara needs at the time – bright, cheery, and able to distract Kara whenever possible. I also like that she actually gets mad at Kara sometimes – so she’s less one-dimensional than Jack.

Favorite Line

I can’t find the exact line now,  I loved when Kara told Jack to stop pushing her against her will. As Jess and I discussed in the podcast, there are so many nuances to wheelchair culture that those of us who aren’t a part of it don’t think about. And I can imagine just how frustrating it must  be to have people push you, even when they mean to help, when you aren’t ready to leave.

Fun Author Fact

Push Girls is co-written by Chelsie Hill & Jessica Love. Chelsie has an incredible story, one that far surpasses even Kara’s! When Chelsie was seventeen, she was in a devastating car accident and became a paraplegic. She now speaks to teens around the country about drunk driving, and started the Walk and Roll Foundation, a nonprofit educating teens on distracted driving, with father. Not only is she an author, nonprofit founder, and motivational speaker – but she is also a competitive wheelchair dancer. You can learn more about her on her website.

Is this worth a book hangover?

I think this book could be a great late middle school or early high school read. It talks about two important subjects – drunk driving and paraplegic life – in an easily digestible and interesting way. While I don’t think it’s quite hangover worthy, it is important – and I love that this story is co-written by someone who can really relate to Kara’s experience.  

Read These Next

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon, about a girl who is allergic to everything, can’t leave the house, and deeply in love with her next door neighbor.  Check out our review here.

Post Author: Anisha

Anisha

Anisha loves books, Gilmore Girls, and her Kuerig. She’s been reading mainstream YA since she was actually a young adult, and Jess is helping her expand her horizons with more diverse, interesting books from newer authors.

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